Poem to praise a girl. Poem of the Masses.



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Poem to praise a girl

Overview[ edit ] The poem was written in and is considered to be one of Yeats's more notable early poems. The poem is based on Irish legend and concerns faeries beguiling a child to come away with them. The poem reflects the early influence of Romantic literature and Pre-Raphaelite verse. Where dips the rocky highland Of Sleuth Wood in the lake, There lies a leafy island Where flapping herons wake There we've hid our faery vats, Full of berry And of reddest stolen cherries. Come away, O human child! To the waters and the wild With a faery, hand in hand. For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. Where the wave of moonlight glosses The dim grey sands with light, Far off by furthest Rosses We foot it all the night, Weaving olden dances Mingling hands and mingling glances Till the moon has taken flight; To and fro we leap And chase the frothy bubbles, While the world is full of troubles And is anxious in its sleep. To the waters and the wild With a faery, hand in hand, For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. Where the wandering water gushes From the hills above Glen-Car, In pools among the rushes That scarce could bathe a star, We seek for slumbering trout And whispering in their ears Give them unquiet dreams; From ferns that drop their tears Over the young streams. Away with us he's going, The solemn-eyed: He'll hear no more the lowing Of the calves on the warm hillside Or the kettle on the hob Sing peace into his breast, Or see the brown mice bob Round and round the oatmeal chest. Publication history[ edit ] The poem was first published in the Irish Monthly in December The poem was then published in a compilation of work by several Irish poets Poems and Ballads of Young Ireland in with several critics praising the poem. In modern culture[ edit ] This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. June Learn how and when to remove this template message The poem was first set to music as his Op. The poem was also set to music and recorded by Loreena McKennitt on her debut album Elemental. Subsequently, additional musical versions were recorded by the folk rock group The Waterboys , appearing on their album Fisherman's Blues , with portions of the poem spoken by Tomas Mac Eoin ; Heather Alexander on her album Wanderlust; and Hamilton Camp on his album Sweet Joy in the song "Celts". Another version, set to music and recorded on the Danny Ellis album Voices , was released in British composer and guitar virtuoso Steve Hackett recorded a version of Yeats' poem under the title "Waters of the Wild" on his album Wild Orchids. Talese, was inspired by the poem. The refrain is prominently featured in Steven Spielberg 's film A. The poem is also featured in the television series Torchwood episode " Small Worlds ", being spoken by a fairy who steals a young girl. The novel Dies the Fire also incorporates the poem into elements of Wiccan rituals. An Irish dance show called The Prophecy is based upon the poem. The refrain is featured in the movie Song of the Sea , which is based largely on Celtic mythology. The novel "Shutter Man" by Richard Montanari references the last stanza of the poem. Poem to praise a girl

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  1. Away with us he's going, The solemn-eyed: New York University Press, Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources.

  2. The original version of the poem was number 20 in the section Chants Democratic in the edition of Leaves of Grass, and can be found in:

  3. The horse that comes from the road. I usually catch this plagerism and if I miss it, a reader always finds it, so it's not worth the risk to you to steal someone else's work.

  4. What is it but nightfall? That is Heaven's part, our part To murmur name upon name, As a mother names her child When sleep at last has come On limbs that had run wild.

  5. In Praise of The Horse does not include photos of your horse. Your kisses leave me guessing Smiling Is Infectious Your kisses leave me guessing snoring is obnoxious is it just proof of life or death? No, no, not night but death; Was it needless death after all?

  6. In Praise of The Horse does not include photos of your horse. To the waters and the wild With a faery, hand in hand, For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

  7. That woman's days were spent In ignorant good-will, Until her voice grew shrill. It can be found in: In Experience, 'The Chimney Sweeper' further explores this flawed perception of child labour in a corrupt society.

  8. The above version of the poem is as it appeared in the edition of Leaves of Grass. To the waters and the wild With a faery, hand in hand.

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